Dinner at the Inn at Little Washington (April 2016)

When our family arrived at the Inn at Little Washington a couple of weeks ago, we were asked if we were celebrating a special occasion (which does happen). This time, however, our response was: “Dinner!”

And dinner that evening was definitely worth celebrating. We started off with the well-known (and delectable) popcorn with black truffles and a series of amuse-bouches. And then the restaurant got down to business. The amuse-bouches that arrived after the first course of amuse-bouches were:

Tempura Asparagus with Hollandaise sauce

tempura asparagus with hollandaise sauce

tempura asparagus with hollandaise sauce

and White Bean Soup with a Chive Gougère.

white bean soup with a gougere

white bean soup with a gougere

All of us had the Mousse of Foie Gras in a Golden Egg Shell with Sauternes Gelée and Blood Orange Rhubarb-Preserve (yum!);

foie gras mousse

foie gras mousse

one of us also had the Carpaccio of Herb-Crusted Elysian Fields Baby Lamb Loin with Caesar Salad Ice Cream (a perennial favorite);

lamb carpaccio

lamb carpaccio

We also all had the Toro with Radishes and Coconut Tapioca Beads and Wasabi Sorbet (the toro was melt-in-your-mouth buttery goodness);

toro with wasabi sorbet

toro with wasabi sorbet

Some of us had the Pan Seared Sea Bass with Roasted Romaine and Sauce Choron (the fish was perfectly cooked);

sea bass

sea bass

Jim and I picked the Inn’s Morel “Meatloaf” with Potato Purée and Jalapeño Ketchup (the fact that I did not regret one moment picking this vegetarian dish over the lamb demonstrates just how good this dish was);

morel "meatloaf"

morel “meatloaf”

The son had the Veal Shenandoah: Prosciutto Wrapped Loin of Veal with Country Ham and Fontina Cheese Ravioli;

veal

veal

and the daughter had the Parsley-Crusted Loin of Jamison Farm’s Lamb with Green Lentils.

lamb

lamb

A quick break to ease the transition into dessert with an Orange-Vanilla Creamsicle with shortbread crumbs;

orange-vanilla creamsicle

orange-vanilla creamsicle

And we finished our lovely meal with the Inn’s Southern Butter Pecan Ice Cream Sandwich with Bittersweet Chocolate and Hot Caramel Sauce

butter pecan ice cream sandwich

butter pecan ice cream sandwich

and A Painter’s Palette of Sorbets;

painter's palette of sorbets

painter’s palette of sorbets

and the Inn’s Spring Fling: Limoncello Pudding, Strawberry Rhubarb Yogurt, Strawberry Rhubarb Sorbet

spring fling

spring fling

It was indeed a meal that definitely celebrated dinner!

Restaurant review: The Pig and the Lady (Honolulu)

I’ve already called dibs on being the lady, but it is so very easy to be the pig at this delightful little restaurant, which is currently the hottest restaurant in Honolulu. The restaurant is located in the middle of Chinatown. Chinatown is perfectly safe and vibrant during the day. During the evening, it’s a little sketchier looking, but it is still perfectly safe. And The Pig and the Lady is well worth the effort.

It’s difficult to describe the cuisine accurately. To say that it’s Vietnamese fusion food only scratches the surface of what the kitchen is capable of. We went first for dinner and then tried it for lunch. You can’t go wrong with either meal, but the dinner menu is definitely the more innovative of the two.

We started dinner with a variety of small plates, called Piggy Smalls on the menu. There were savory beignets served with parmesan cream,

savory beignets

savory beignets

parmesan cream

parmesan cream

smoked eggplant served on puffed rice crackers, and

smoked eggplant

smoked eggplant

fried potatoes, along with a side of home-made pickles.

fried potatoes

fried potatoes

house made pickles

house made pickles

Out of the group, the savory beignets were our favorite, although everything was very good.

Entrees included their signature dish, which is pho French dip and Manila clams. This is a French dip banh mi served with a yuzu pho broth containing braised Manila clams and taro. You dip the banh mi in the broth to eat. The banh mi was delicious, although I’m not sure the clam broth wasn’t better. Either way, it was all fabulous!

pho & clam broth

pho & clam broth

We also split a braised lamb served bo kho style, which means a lamb shank cooked with southern Vietnamese spices and lemongrass, butter roasted carrots, pickled shallots, and herbs. I’m not sure which entrée was better—better not to have to choose!

braised lamb

braised lamb

Dessert consisted of kaya beignets, which are beignets dusted with coconut powdered sugar and a bit of espresso powder, and

dessert beignets

dessert beignets

P&L soft serve

P&L soft serve

P&L soft serve

Our waitress recommended that we try lunch, as the menu for lunch is slightly different. While lunch is a little more traditionally Vietnamese, it still offers the kitchen an opportunity to give its own individual twist to traditional dishes.

Jim had the pho French dip, which is a banh mi served with 12 hour roast brisket, thai basil chimmichurri, and a pho au jus. It was melt-in-your-mouth delicious.

pho banh mi

pho banh mi

I had the pho-sta, consisting of hand cut pasta cooked with pho broth, parmesan, mung bean and other traditional pho flavors. Loved it!

pho-sta

pho-sta

The restaurant itself is an interesting mix of families, singles (mostly at the lively bar), and a smattering of food-obsessed tourists. Reservations are recommended if you don’t want to deal with a long wait. (It fills up quickly.) We highly highly recommend this restaurant!

The Pig and the Lady is found at 83 N. King Street in Honolulu (www.thepigandthelady.com).

 

Restaurant review: Chef Mavro, Take 2 (Honolulu)

For our second dinner at Chef Mavro, we went with the 4 course menu and added the parmesan black truffle risotto as a fifth course (yes, we do indeed live to eat).

The amouse bouche was once again the delicious watercress soup with “egg salad sandwich.”

watercress soup with "egg salad sandwich"

watercress soup with “egg salad sandwich”

We started off with the meli-melo, a salad containing hearts of palm, pickled hibiscus, avocado purée, and baby beets. I’m not a huge salad fan (I’m of the same philosophy as Ron Swanson, the character from “Parks and Rec” who says, “Salads are the food my food eats.”), but this was delicious.

meli melo

meli melo

We then had the snapper, served Asian style, with shitake mushrooms and ginger, topped with fried cilantro and green onion on basmati rice. While I liked the opah from the 6 course menu, this was fabulous (and better).

snapper

snapper

Our next course was the parmesan black truffle risotto, which was just as good as the first time we had it.

black truffle risotto

black truffle risotto

The entrée dish was duckling served with fennel and winter citrus and star anise duck jus. It was really wonderful.

duckling

duckling

confit

confit

(Jim substituted his duck for the lamb loin, served with cranberry preserve and sunchokes.) The bite I had was excellent.

lamb

lamb

And, after the palate cleansing melon in champagne gelée, we had the coconut déclinaison, which was a coconut pound cake served with coconut-shiso sorbet and a coconut sauce with basil seeds. This may not sound like it would work, but it most certainly did.

coconut déclinaison

coconut déclinaison

What we like about Chef Mavro is that not only is the food delicious, it is also beautifully presented. The staff is friendly and helpful, and the chef himself will make the rounds in the evening to chat. They were amazingly wonderful meals!

Chef Mavro is at 1969 S. King St, Honolulu (www.chefmavro.com).

Restaurant review: Chef Mavro (Honolulu)

We have been regular diners at Chef Mavro whenever we are in Honolulu (which is more often than I am willing to admit). Last week, when we were there, we took the opportunity to dine at Chef Mavro twice. (I know, I know.)

The first time, we picked the 6 course menu. In addition, it was BLACK TRUFFLE season (calloo, callay!). So, this is what we had:

The amouse bouche was watercress soup with an “egg salad sandwich” on the side. It’s difficult to get watercress flavoring in a soup strong enough to taste like watercress, but this was the exception. It was delicious!

watercress soup with an "egg salad sandwich"

watercress soup with an “egg salad sandwich”

We started off with the foie gras, which was served as a parfait, accompanied by pineapple relish, toasted pine nuts, and a huge side of toasted brioche. Yummy!

foie gras terrine

foie gras terrine

Next up was the opah (snapper), which was served with red beets, pickled Japanese cucumber and topped with a coffee flour rye bread crumble. Highly delectable.

snapper

snapper

The lobster was next. This was accompanied by a house-made kabocha confit and served with kabocha and a crustacean essence purée. It’s one of Jim’s favorite dishes here.

lobster

lobster

We substituted out the cheese course in favor of the parmesan black truffle risotto. It was everything a black truffle risotto dish should be (which is to say heavenly).

black truffle risotto

black truffle risotto

We also upgraded to the Australian Tajima wagyu medallions, served with an eggplant purée, charred leeks, and an island green pepper corn sauce. Yum, yum, yum.

wagyu

wagyu

The palate cleanser was melon served in a champagne gelée.

melon in champagne gelee

melon in champagne gelee

And the final course, dessert, was chocolate. This time, it was a chocolate bar, served with a burgundy poached pear and sorbet. Even for not being a huge chocolate fan, this was delicious.

chocolate dessert

chocolate dessert

Hamilton (the musical) and Per Se (the restaurant)

We were in New York this past weekend in order to see “Hamilton,” the musical that seems to have taken the entire country (okay, maybe just the East coast) by storm.  The tickets and a backstage tour by Leslie Odom, Jr. (the actor who plays Aaron Burr) were a Christmas gift to the kids.  (I know—I want to come back as one of my kids in my next life, too.)
We flew up Friday afternoon.  Saturday morning, Marcus and I went to a Star Wars costume exhibition at the Discovery Museum.  Contrary to my expectations, at least, the exhibit was surprisingly extensive and well-curated.  It was interesting to see what materials were used (the Jedi robes were often made of raw silk—easier to clean and fast-drying—to simulate the look of cotton and linen), what cultures they borrowed from (the Imperial uniforms were taken directly from a Nazi division), and what the costumes were supposed to represent (Darth Maul’s costume resembled a samurai warrior’s).

Boba Fett!

Boba Fett!

But the highlight of the weekend was “Hamilton.”  While it is somewhat difficult at first to wrap your head around a 3 hour musical about the Founding Fathers in rap form, it really is a marvelous performance.  The soundtrack is amazing—clever and unusual—and the performance is very visually appealing.  It was as good (if not better) as we all hoped it would be.  Even Jim, the skeptical one, thought it was much better than he expected, although he didn’t like the ending (he likes happy endings).

waiting for "Hamilton"

waiting for “Hamilton”

the set for Hamilton

the set for Hamilton

After the performance, we went backstage (actually, onto the stage) where we were introduced to Leslie Odom, Jr.  With all due respect to the rest of the cast who were all fabulous, I thought he was the best pure actor of the show.  (And fans of Person of Interest will know him as Peter Collier, the head of Vigilance.)

with Leslie Odom, Jr.

with Leslie Odom, Jr.

He also was about as nice as a person can be.  He found a Sharpie, signed the kids’ programs, chatted with them, and then introduced them to Daveed Diggs, who played the Marquis de Lafayette/Thomas Jefferson in the musical.

with Daveed Diggs (taken by Leslie Odom, Jr)

with Daveed Diggs (taken by Leslie Odom, Jr)

After that, the kids met Jonathan Groff (who played George III and has the funniest lines in the show) who was also exceptionally friendly.

with Jonathan Groff

with Jonathan Groff

And, finally, they met Anthony Ramos, who plays Laurens and Philip Hamilton, who was lovely.

with Anthony Mess

with Anthony Ramos

They also caught a glimpse of Lin-Manuel Miranda backstage as well.  Jade was so beside herself with excitement over all of this that she couldn’t talk (this is a rarity, by the way).
Once everyone could breathe again, we walked over to Per Se, the New York restaurant belonging to Thomas Keller (of French Laundry fame).  Per Se recently had been panned by the New York Times restaurant reviewer, but we saw no sign of slippage at all.  The food was amazingly fabulous (the egg custard with black truffles served in an egg shell was an especially memorable dish for me), the service was attentive and friendly but not obsequious, and all was well in the Per Se world.  We even got a tour of the kitchen, which is huge, especially by New York standards.

in the kitchen of Per Se

in the kitchen of Per Se

All in all, it was about as perfect a day as it was possible to visualize when we first arranged the trip.
Our apologies to all of our New York friends.  We would very much have liked to have seen you but ran out of time.  (A 3 hour musical will do that.)  We will try and see all of you on our next trip!

Dinner at the Inn at Little Washington (again)

I know we were just there in December, but our son wanted to celebrate his excellent report card with a dinner at the Inn, and who are we to say no to that? So off we went in mid-January to enjoy another scrumptious meal (and many congratulations regarding his academic performance).

The kitchen was kind enough to provide an appetizer that wasn’t on the regular menu. It was a seared slice of toro (the fatty belly from the tuna) from Hawaii served with Asian greens and sprinkled with sesame seeds. “Seared” was perhaps a generous description (the kitchen might have waved it over the heat for a nanosecond or two), which is just how we like it. The toro melted in your mouth—it was an incredibly succulent mouthful.

seared toro

seared toro

Next up for our son was seared foie gras–again, generously provided by the kitchen despite the fact that it wasn’t on the menu. This dish was evidently good enough for him not to share.

seared foie gras

seared foie gras

The remaining three members of the family had the golden egg filled with a mousse of foie gras and sauternes gelee. (The mousse is room temperature, which is why the son wasn’t a fan—he likes hot dishes for his meals.) However, none of the rest of us was complaining. This is a relatively new dish on the Inn’s menu, and it is heavenly.

golden egg with foie gras mousse

golden egg with foie gras mousse

Next up for the son was one of his favorite Inn dishes—macaroni and cheese done Inn-style. He was thrilled to see it back on the menu.

mac-and-cheese

mac-and-cheese

The daughter and I had the pork cheek agnolotti bathed in uni butter. I hesitated about ordering this dish, as I do not like sea urchin AT ALL, but Jim encouraged me to get it, and I’m glad he did. The uni provided a subtle flavor to the veal cheek, and the sauce was, of course, delectable.

pork cheek agnolotti

pork cheek agnolotti

Jim, on the other hand, ordered one of his favorite dishes—the tin of sin. Osetra caviar on top of a crab rillettes and served with a side of brioche. For caviar lovers, this is a must try.

tin of sin

tin of sin

For entrees, three of us had the short rib of bison with local mustard greens and gremolata.

short rib of bison

short rib of bison

The daughter chose the cauliflower “steak” with yellow Indian curry.

cauliflower "steak"

cauliflower “steak”

As we paused for breath (and stomach room), we were served with a palate cleanser of the Inn’s version of the orange creamsicle in a dish of shortbread crumbs.

creamsicle

creamsicle

And then came the desserts. The congratulatory dessert was mint chocolate chip ice cream accompanied by chocolate ribbons.

mint chocolate chip ice cream

mint chocolate chip ice cream

The daughter chose a lemon meringue tartlet.

lemon meringue tartlet

lemon meringue tartlet

Jim chose the classic Inn dessert of the Seven Deadly Sins.

seven deadly sins

seven deadly sins

And I had my standby of the Granny Smith Apple Tart.

granny smith apple tart

granny smith apple tart

We emerged from the dinner with all of our taste buds enjoying their food coma. Another fabulous dinner at the Inn!

 

The Inn is located at the intersection of Middle and Main Street, Washington, Virgnia. You can find out more about the Inn at www.theinnatlittlewashington.com.

Restaurant review: Kinship (Washington, DC)

Kinship is a newly opened restaurant in Washington, DC. The chef-owner is Eric Ziebold (formerly of French Laundry and CityZen) and his wife, Celia Laurent. We have been huge fans of Eric’s cooking since his CityZen days and have been looking forward to his opening up his own restaurant for months.

The menu is organized a little differently than most restaurant menus. There are four main categories: Craft, History, Ingredients, and Indulgence. Under these categories, the first two entries are generally appetizer-sized, the next two entries are entrée-sized, and the last entry is dessert. (I have heard complaints from some diners about this, but I’m not sure how you would read “Bahibe Chocolate Tart” and assume it’s anything but a dessert.) I also love menus that include desserts so that I can decide whether to save a lot of or a little room for the course. (Notice that I did not say save no room.) 🙂

There is a fifth category called “For the Table.” Hopefully, this category is self-explanatory, as it consists of dishes ample enough for the entire table to share.

Our group started off with the following appetizers (and there were thumbs up from all the diners):

Oeuf à la Brick au Thon (feuille de brick fried egg, tuna confit, and sweet pepper marmalade)

oeuf a la brick au thon

oeuf a la brick au thon

Aoyagi Clams (yuzu, shitake tempura, baby bok choy, and garlic fried rice)

aoyagi clams

aoyagi clams

Blue Fin Toro Sashimi (sweet, sour, salty,and spicy flavors); and

blue fin toro sashimi

blue fin toro sashimi

Path Valley Farms Sunchokes (clementine segments, toasted pepitas, and cilantro chimichurri)

path valley farms sunchokes

path valley farms sunchokes

Entrees included:

Seared Muscovy Duck (napa cabbage, peanuts, honeycrisp apples, and fermented black beans)

seared muscovy duck

seared muscovy duck

Salt Crusted Dorade (with roasted cauliflower, raisins, honey-saffron sauce, and orzo) from the “For the Table” menu; and

salt crusted dorade

salt crusted dorade

orzo

orzo

Elysian Fields Farm Lamb (sweet pepper stew and Anson Mills grits), also from the “For the Table” menu

elysian fields farm lamb

elysian fields farm lamb

grits

grits

Desserts (with no photos) were:

Sticky Toffee Pudding (with Meyer lemon marmalade, fig membrillo butterscotch, and Earl Grey ice cream); and

Valrhona Guanaja Custard Cake (with pecan nduja, espelette caramel, pralines ‘n’ cream ice cream).  (This was wonderfully decadent, and I’m not even that fond of chocolate!)

The food was fabulous (as expected with Eric at the helm). Service was very good, but the timing of the kitchen is still a bit off. We had a lengthy wait between the time we placed our order and the time the appetizers came out. In addition, if you want the Kinship Roast Chicken, it’s an hour wait, so if you know you want it, then place the order when you sit down. There is also a wait for the Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough Souffle so order it with the main meal if it’s your dessert of choice. That being said, we expect these kinks to be ironed out with time.

The space is very interesting—it’s spare and minimalist. There are a couple of alcoves with tables, and these are definitely the best seats for both sound and comfort.

And, finally, a disclosure: we are very minor investors in Kinship.

Kinship is located at 1015 7th St, NW, Washington, DC 20001 (www.kinshipdc.com).

Inn at Little Washington Over The Holidays

Jim and I have a tradition we’ve done for many years, which is to go spend a night at the Inn at Little Washington between Christmas and New Year’s, just the two of us. (This does not go over well with the kids, who also want to dine there and spend the night, but we ignore their protests.)

The menu has changed a bit since I last blogged about a meal there, so I thought I’d take you through what we had last night.

We started, of course, with one of my favorite dishes there—truffle popcorn. You will never want to have movie theatre popcorn again after having this. The popcorn is tossed with some herbs and spices, but the whole point of this popcorn is that it is topped with shaved black truffle. Yummmmmmm…..

truffle popcorn

truffle popcorn

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Next up were an assortment of amuse-bouches. These included miniature veal cheek sandwiches with homemade chips and miniature pickles;

miniature veal cheek sandwiches

miniature veal cheek sandwiches

the world’s smallest baked potato topped with caviar, “chips & dip,” cucumber rillettes topped with fish roe, and a red wine risotto ball.

assortment of amuse-bouches

assortment of amuse-bouches

Next up was a pheasant consommé accompanied by a chive gougère. The consommé was simply unbelievably fabulous and went onto my list of all-time favorite dishes (it’s a long list with a lot of Inn dishes on it).

pheasant consomme

pheasant consomme

The next course was an egg filled with a mousse of foie gras and port gelée. Not rich and decadent at all…

foie gras mousse in an egg

foie gras mousse in an egg

An old favorite of the Inn’s was resurrected and reformulated–fire and ice, which is now seared tuna served with watermelon radishes in a sesame-ginger sauce and topped with cucumber sorbet. It was like welcoming back an old friend.

fire & ice

fire & ice

I then had a raviolo of spinach topped with—you guessed it—white Alba truffles. Delectable (and so good for you, too!).

spinach raviolo (with truffles!)

spinach raviolo (with truffles!)

Jim had sweet-and-sour diver’s scallops accompanied by a shisito pepper. The sweet-and-sour was restrained and elegant, and the shisito pepper gave the dish a nice contrasting flavor (or so I’m told, I didn’t get a bite of that).

sweet and sour scallops

sweet and sour scallops

The final “entrée” was a short rib of bison that had been cooking for 14 hours, served with mustard greens and topped with homemade onion rings. The slight bitterness of the mustard greens went well with the richness of the bison and the slightly sweet onion rings.

short rib of bison

short rib of bison

The palate cleanser was the Inn’s version of a dreamsicle accompanied with crumbs of shortbread.

dreamsicle

dreamsicle

And finally (not pictured) was a Granny Smith apple tart (for me) and a visit by Faira the Cow and Cameron the cheese maestro (for Jim). And the beautiful cappuccino accompanied by a slice of biscotti.

oh, biscotti!

oh, biscotti!

The Inn was, of course, still decorated for the holidays, with festively decorated trees and garlands and holiday lights. It was a wonderful way to bring the year to an end!

Tokyo and the US-Japan Leadership Program

We traveled to Tokyo in late July to participate in the US-Japan Leadership Program alumni weekend but arrived a few days early so that we could do the important things in Tokyo—Tokyo DisneySea and Tokyo Disneyland. 🙂

(Our son came with us on the trip, but our daughter was doing her community service project and wasn’t able to make it.)

We had never been to DisneySea, and it was a really fabulous experience to visit a Disney park where everything was new. Our favorite rides there were Journey to the Center of the Earth and the Indiana Jones ride (which is based on the horrible Indiana Jones and the Crystal Skull movie). There is a Stormrider ride that is somewhat similar to the Star Tours simulator ride that is also very well done.

Tokyo DisneySea

Tokyo DisneySea

We had only been to Tokyo Disneyland once before. Once again, the Winnie-the-Pooh ride was our favorite (and it’s the best version of the ride in all of the Disney parks, hands down). We also loved the Buzz Lightyear and Monsters, Inc. rides there. And we are continually fascinated by the different flavors of popcorn available in the Tokyo Disneyland park—honey, chocolate, curry, teriyaki, and regular. Curry popcorn was the Ms’ favorite flavor, but Jim was NOT a fan.

Tokyo Disneyland

Tokyo Disneyland

It was also fun to compare the design and rides with all of the other Disney parks. Yes, I know we are hopeless Disney addicts!

We ate at a one Michelin star teppanyaki restaurant called Ukai-tei. It was an interesting combination of classically trained teppanyaki and classically trained French chefs in one restaurant (and chef). The food was fabulous, and it was a great experience.

The USJLP alumni weekend was a tremendous amount of fun. There were over 70 Fellows who attended, and many more Americans than typical. The nice thing about having a critical mass of Fellows is that you don’t feel as much like you’re intruding on the delegates’ fun and bonding. It was really lovely to see all the Fellows, catch up on their news, and meet the delegates (some of whom I already knew from DC gatherings). There was even a bonding amongst what we hope to be the future generation of USJLP-ers!

future USJLPLers

future USJLPLers

Oh, and I can’t forget that only in Japan can you find square watermelons!

IMG_2944

Restaurant review: Minibar by José Andrés

We dined at Minibar the other night, which is most accurately described as “better food through chemistry.” Seriously, dining at Minibar is a gastronomical experience (rather than simply dining) and a seriously impressive (and delicious) look at molecular gastronomy in cooking.

We started off with a series of appetizers, which included:

Yogurt carnation (not pictured)

Pineapple shortbread

pineapple shortbread

pineapple shortbread

Green Almonds

green almonds

green almonds

Parmesan Cupcakes

parmesan cupcakes

parmesan cupcakes

Pizza Jose’s Way

pizza Jose's way

pizza Jose’s way

This plethora of appetizers was then followed by Liquid Olive

liquid olive

liquid olive

And then a Rubber Ducky with foie gras ice cream inside (which earned not only the favorite vote from some of the diners but universally the best serving dish):

rubber ducky

rubber ducky

We then were served a palate cleanser called a Yuzujito (sherry, yuzu, cucumber, and phosphate).

yuzujito

yuzujito

Next came a burger (a way too simple name for the deliciousness it contained):

"burger"

“burger”

Then Asparagus con Mayonesa

asparagus con mayonesa

asparagus con mayonesa

Followed by Fusilli al Pesto (the fusilli is clear and then filled)

fusilli al pesto

fusilli al pesto

And then Smoked Oysters in Escabeche

smoked oysters in escabeche

smoked oysters in escabeche

smoked oysters, cont.

smoked oysters, cont.

In case that wasn’t enough food, it was followed by Fabes con Almejas

fabes con almejas

fabes con almejas

A Lobster in Sequence (the first one was Lobster Knuckle on Chicken Skin, which got a few votes for favorite dish)

lobster on chicken skin

lobster on chicken skin

Completed by Lobster Tail, Peanut Butter, and Honey

lobster tail

lobster tail

Next up was Ham and Peas (the “roll” is a molecular version of Spanish Iberico ham)

ham & peas

ham & peas

Then Squab and Oysters

squab & oysters

squab & oysters

And the final entrée of Thai Rabbit.

thai rabbit

thai rabbit

But, wait, we’re not finished—there’s still dessert:

Bonne Bouche Cheese Puff (I’m told it was delicious)

cheese puff

cheese puff

Strawberries and Cream

strawberries & cream

strawberries & cream

This is not Carrot Cake (but it sure tasted like one!)

"carrot cake"

“carrot cake”

Piña Colada Tablet

pina colada tablet

pina colada tablet

Caterpillar (but not real ones!)

caterpillar

caterpillar

Doughnuts (a universal favorite and filled with ice cream!)

doughnuts

doughnuts

Éclair

eclair

eclair

And the T Rex is serving White Chocolate Asparagus, Liquid Bourbon Peanut, and a Cherry Bomb

Tony the T rex

Tony the T rex

The dinner also came with paired wines, which included:

2014 Dr. Herman Ürziger Würtzgarten Riesling from Kabinett Mosel, Germany

2013 Nigl Grüner Veltliner from Freiheit, Austria

2012 Didier Dagueneau Silex, Pouilly Fumé

2013 Shafer Chardonnay Red Shoulder Ranch from Napa Valley

2011 Dunn Vineyards Cabernet Sauvignon, also from Napa Valley

2001 Domaine de la Grange des Pères Vin de Pays de L’Hérault from Languedoc, France

2013 Lucy Rosé from the Santa Lucia Highlands, U.S.

20101 Kracher Auslese Muskat Ottonel from Burgenland, Austria

1985 Dow’s Port, Portugal

We finally (after about 3 hours) rolled out of the restaurant, wondering if the food coma was permanent. Minibar isn’t somewhere I could eat every day (I’d weigh 200+ pounds if I did), but it is an incredibly fabulous dining experience. I highly recommend it!

Minibar by José Andrés is located at 855 E St, NW, Washington, DC (www.minibarbyjoseandres.com).